Tag: clean eating

Muffuletta Salad

Muffuletta Salad

The iconic sandwich of New Orleans, deconstructed: this grain-free salad looses the bread and keeps all the good stuff. If you miss the bread, toss in some torn croutons, ideally made from seeded Italian bread. Other swaps: we got rid of the meat, upped the beans, […]

Miso-Pumpkin Soup

Miso-Pumpkin Soup

Rich, creamy and dairy-free: this bright, vegan-friendly soup is the perfect fall dinner. To make your own pumpkin puree, cut a 3-pound pie pumpkin (not carving pumpkin) into eighths, scoop out seeds, and steam pumpkin pieces for 20 minutes, or until soft. Let cool, peel […]

Cherry + Macadamia Grain-Free Muffins

Cherry + Macadamia Grain-Free Muffins

Best breakfast ever: high-protein muffins that make great use of macadamias, almonds and chia seeds. We used tart, unsweetened cherries for ours, or use fruit-sweetened varieties. Add chopped pistachios for texture and a burst of vibrant color.

Makes 12 muffins

1 1/4 cups almond flour
1/4 cup ground chia seeds
1/3 cup coconut sugar
1 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
3 eggs, at room temperature
1/4 cup milk, coconut milk or almond milk
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1/2 cup dried cherries
1/3 cup chopped macadamia nuts

1.    Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Grease a 12-cup muffin tin with coconut oil, or line with paper muffin liners or squares of parchment.

2.   In a large mixing bowl, combine almond flour, chia seeds, coconut sugar, baking powder and salt. Stir to mix.

3.   Crack eggs into a separate bowl. Using a hand mixer, or in a standing mixer, beat eggs until they’re light and frothy, about 2 minutes. Turn speed to low and beat in milk and vanilla. Using a spatula, fold dry ingredients into the mixture. Fold in cherries and nuts.

4.   Spoon mixture into prepared muffin tins, filling each about halfway full. Bake at 375 for 15 to 20 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.

5.    Remove from oven and let cool completely; if you’re using paper liners, muffins can be turned out of pan while slightly warm. Serve immediately.

Habanero-Peach Salsa

Habanero-Peach Salsa

I left the skins on, since they add nutrients and a beautiful color—and I’m lazy like that. But peel yours if you’d like. Dunk whole peaches in boiling water for 30 seconds, then drop them in a bowl of ice water. The skins will slip […]

Basil, Kale and Macadamia Pesto

Basil, Kale and Macadamia Pesto

Best way to sneak kale (or spinach, or any green) into your diet: enrobed it in olive oil, lace it with garlic and basil, and pretend it’s pesto. Macadamia nuts make a rich, indulgent pesto; or use cashews for a less-pricey option. This  recipe uses Parmesan […]

Potato and Carrot Latkes

Potato and Carrot Latkes

Traditionally made and served during Hanukkah, latkes are small, savory pancakes made from a base of potatoes, and often incorporating other vegetables. I added carrots for a hint of sweetness and burst of color. Heirloom carrots, in red, purple and yellow, are gorgeous in this recipe.

The secret to a light, crispy texture: squeeze out as much water as possible before frying; wet vegetables mean mushy latkes—no good! So squeeze vigorously, and get those potatoes, carrots and parsnips as dry as possible. Other tips for maximum crispiness: use high-starch russet potatoes, and never, ever crowd the pan.

Without being too irreverent, you can try variations: add Indian curry and serve them with raita (yogurt, chopped cilantro and cucumber) or cook them in a small waffle iron and serve with mango chutney; use purple potatoes and serve with a honey-vanilla creme fraiche, or try red potatoes, leave the skins on, and servec with caviar and sour cream.

Remember, though, that a perfect latke stands on its own, with the simplest of toppings. So we serve ours the traditional way: light, crispy, hot, served with applesauce (homemade) and creme fraiche or sour cream and chives. Anything else is gilding the lily.

Serves 4 (makes 12 latkes)

1 pound russet potato, peeled and coarsely grated
1/2 pound carrots, scrubbed and coarsely grated
1 small yellow onion, peeled and coarsely grated
2 eggs
1/4 cup matzo meal
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
Canola or other neutral cooking oil for frying
Minced chives or scallion greens(optional)
Applesauce for serving
Sour cream or crème fraiche

  1. Line a large platter with several layers of paper towels; set aside.
  2. Combine grated potatoes, carrots and onions in a lint-free kitchen towel. Twist the towel to squeeze out as much water as possible. Transfer vegetables to a second towel and repeat the process. Set aside.
  3. In a large bowl, beat eggs, then stir in matzo meal, salt and pepper. Add potatoes, carrots and onions.
  4. Heat 1/4 inch of oil oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Drop four scoops of batter, about 1/4 cup each, into pan. Fry for 2 to 3 minutes, pressing down gently with a spatula, until golden and crispy. Turn and cook on remaining side for 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer latkes to paper-towel lined sheet to drain and repeat with remaining batter. Add additional oil to pan if needed, allowing it to heat again before frying more latkes.
  5. To serve, arrange latkes on a large serving platter. Garnish with chives or scallions, if desired, and serve hot, with applesauce and sour cream or creme fraiche.